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What is the Web?

The World Wide Web, abbreviated as WWW and commonly known as The Web, is a system of interlinked hypertext documents contained on the Internet. With a web browser, one can view web pages that may contain text, images, videos, and other multimedia and navigate between them by using hyperlinks. Using concepts from earlier hypertext systems, British engineer and computer scientist Sir Tim Berners Lee, now the Director of the World Wide Web Consortium, wrote a proposal in March 1989 for what would eventually become the World Wide Web. He was later joined by Belgian computer scientist Robert Cailliau while both were working at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. In 1990, they proposed using "HyperText [...] to link and access information of various kinds as a web of nodes in which the user can browse at will", and released that web in December.

The World-Wide Web (W3) was developed to be a pool of human knowledge, which would allow collaborators in remote sites to share their ideas and all aspects of a common project." If two projects are independently created, rather than have a central figure make the changes, the two bodies of information could form into one cohesive piece of work.

Connected by the existing Internet, other websites were created around the world, adding international standards for domain names and the HTML. The World Wide Web enabled the spread of information over the Internet through an easy-to-use and flexible format. It thus played an important role in popularizing use of the Internet.

The terms Internet and World Wide Web are often used in every-day speech without much distinction. However, the Internet and the World Wide Web are not one and the same. The Internet is a global system of interconnected computer networks. In contrast, the Web is one of the services that runs on the Internet. It is a collection of interconnected documents and other resources, linked by hyperlinks and URLs. In short, the Web is an application running on the Internet. Viewing a web page on the World Wide Web normally begins either by typing the URL of the page into a web browser, or by following a hyperlink to that page or resource. The web browser then initiates a series of communication messages, behind the scenes, in order to fetch and display it.
First, the server-name portion of the URL is resolved into an IP address using the global, distributed Internet database known as the domain name system, or DNS. This IP address is necessary to contact the Web server. The browser then requests the resource by sending an HTTP request to the Web server at that particular address. In the case of a typical web page, the HTML text of the page is requested first and parsed immediately by the web browser, which then makes additional requests for images and any other files that form parts of the page. Statistics measuring a website's popularity are usually based either on the number of 'page views' or associated server 'hits' (file requests) that take place.

While receiving these files from the web server, browsers may progressively render the page onto the screen as specified by its HTML, CSS, and other web languages. Any images and other resources are incorporated to produce the on-screen web page that the user sees. Most web pages will themselves contain hyperlinks to other related pages and perhaps to downloads, source documents, definitions and other web resources. Such a collection of useful, related resources, interconnected via hypertext links, is what was dubbed a "web" of information. Making it available on the Internet created what Tim Berners-Lee first called the WorldWideWeb (in its original CamelCase, which was subsequently discarded) in November 1990.

World Wide Web. (2010, February 5). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:58, February 5, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=World_Wide_Web&oldid=342104538

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Who is Jack Webb?

John Randolph "Jack" Webb (April 2, 1920 – December 23, 1982) was an American actor, television producer, director and screenwriter, who is most famous for his role as Sergeant Joe Friday in the radio and television series Dragnet. He was also the founder of his own production company, Mark VII Limited.

Born in Santa Monica, California, Webb grew up in the Bunker Hill section of Los Angeles. His father left home before Webb was born, and Webb never knew him. One of the tenants in his mother's rooming house was an ex-jazzman who began Webb's lifelong interest in jazz by giving him a recording of Bix Beiderbecke's "At the Jazz Band Ball." Webb graduated from Belmont High School in Los Angeles. He then studied art. During World War II, Webb enlisted in the United States Army Air Forces. He served as a crewman on a B-24 bomber, then later a drill instructor.

Following his discharge at the end of the war, he moved to San Francisco to star in his own radio show. The Jack Webb Show was a half-hour comedy that had a limited run on ABC radio in 1946. By 1949 he had abandoned comedy for drama, and starred in Pat Novak for Hire, a radio show about a man who worked as an unlicensed private detective. The program co-starred Raymond Burr. 'Pat Novak' was notable for writing that imitated, almost to parody, the hard-boiled style of such writers as Raymond Chandler, with lines such as: "She drifted into the room like 98 pounds of warm smoke. Her voice was hot and sticky--like a furnace full of marshmallows."

His most famous motion picture role was as the combat-hardened Marine Corps drill instructor at Parris Island in the 1957 film The D.I, with Don Dubbins as a callow Marine private. Webb's characterization in this role (Sgt. Jim Moore) would be reflected in much of his later acting.

Webb had a featured role as a crime lab technician in the 1948 film He Walked by Night, based on the real-life murder of a California Highway Patrolman. The film was done in semidocumentary style with technical assistance provided by Detective Sergeant Marty Wynn of the Los Angeles Police Department. The film gave Webb the idea for Dragnet.
With much assistance from Sgt. Wynn and legendary LAPD chief William H. Parker, Dragnet hit the airwaves in 1949 (running until 1954). It appeared on television from 1951 to 1959 on the NBC network. Webb played Sgt. Joe Friday, and Barton Yarborough co-starred as Sgt. Ben Romero. Dragnet become a successful television show in 1952.

Dragnet began with the narration "The story you are about to see is true. Only the names have been changed to protect the innocent." At the end of each show, the trial verdict of the suspect was announced by Hal Gibney. Webb frequently re-created entire floors of buildings on sound stages, such as the police headquarters at Los Angeles City Hall and a floor of the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner.

In Dragnet's early days, Webb continued to appear in movies, notably as the best friend of William Holden's character in the 1950 Billy Wilder film Sunset Boulevard. In 1950, Webb appeared alongside future 1960's Dragnet partner Harry Morgan in the film noir Dark City. In contrast to the pair's straight-arrow image in 'Dragnet', they play a vicious pair of card-shark punks in Dark City.

In 1951, Webb introduced a short-lived radio series, Pete Kelly's Blues, in an attempt to bring the music he loved to a broader audience. That show became the basis for a 1955 movie of the same name. However, neither the radio series nor the movie was very successful.

In 1963, Webb took over from William T. Orr as executive producer of the ABC detective series 77 Sunset Strip. He brought about wholesale changes in the program and retained only Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., in the role of Stuart Bailey. The outcome was a disaster. Ratings fell and the series was cancelled in its sixth season.

Beginning in early 1967, Webb produced and starred in a new color version of Dragnet for NBC, this time for Universal Television, which packaged all his subsequent shows. Harry Morgan co-starred as Officer Bill Gannon. (Ben Alexander was unavailable, as he was co-starring in Felony Squad on ABC.) The show's pilot, originally produced as a made-for-TV movie in 1966, did not air until 1969. The TV movie was based on the Harvey Glatman serial killings. The TV series ran through 1970.

To distinguish it from the original series, the year of production was added to the title (Dragnet 1967, Dragnet 1968, etc.). The revival emphasized crime prevention and outreach to the public. Its attempts to address the contemporary youth-drug culture (such as the Blue Boy episode voted 85th-best TV episode of all time by TV Guide and TV Land) have led certain episodes on the topic to achieve cult status due to their strained attempts to be "with-it", such as Friday grilling Blue Boy by asking him "You're pretty high and far out, aren't you? What kind of kick are you on, son?".

In 1968, with Robert A. Cinader, Webb produced NBC's popular Adam-12, which focused on uniformed LAPD officers Pete Malloy (Martin Milner) and Jim Reed (Kent McCord), which ran until 1975.

In the 1970s Webb began to expand his Mark VII Limited into other shows. The most successful of his 1970s efforts was Emergency!, which portrayed the fledgling paramedic program of the L.A. County Fire Department, The show become a huge success, running from 1972-79, with ratings occasionally even topping its time slot competitor, All in the Family. Webb cast his ex-wife, Julie London, as well as her second husband and Dragnet ensemble player Bobby Troup, as nurse Dixie McCall and Dr. Joe Early. There was even a cartoon spin-off, Emergency+4.

Jack Webb began working on scripts for a revival of Dragnet with Kent McCord as his partner. However, he died of a heart attack in 1982 at the age of 62.

Webb has two Stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame: for radio at 7040 Hollywood Boulevard, and for television at 6728 Hollywood Boulevard.
Jack Webb. (2010, February 3). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:56, February 5, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Jack_Webb&oldid=341723318

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What is Dragnet?

Dragnet, syndicated as Badge 714, is a radio and television crime drama about the cases of a dedicated Los Angeles police detective, Sergeant Joe Friday, and his partners. The show takes its name from an actual police term, a "dragnet", meaning a system of coordinated measures for apprehending criminals.

Dragnet was perhaps the most famous and influential police procedural drama in media history. The series gave millions of audience members a feel for the boredom and drudgery, as well as the danger and heroism, of real-life police work. Dragnet earned praise for improving the public opinion of police officers.

Actor and producer Jack Webb's aims in Dragnet were for realism and unpretentious acting. He achieved both goals, and Dragnet remains a key influence on subsequent police dramas in many media.

The show's cultural impact is such that even after five decades, elements of Dragnet are known to those who have never seen or heard the program:

While "Just the facts, ma'am" has come to be known as Dragnet's catchphrase, it was never actually uttered by Joe Friday; the closest he came were, "All we want are the facts, ma'am" and "All we know are the facts, ma'am". "Just the facts, ma'am" comes from the Stan Freberg parody St. George and the Dragonet.

Dragnet (series). (2010, January 10). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:51, February 5, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Dragnet_(series)&oldid=336987420

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At Langton Cherubino Group, Ltd. (“LCG”), we respect your privacy and are committed to protecting personal information that you may share with us. This Privacy Policy describes how we may collect and use your personal information.

Information We Collect

LCG does not collect personally identifiable information from individuals unless they provide it to us voluntarily and knowingly. If you elect to submit any personal information through our website (the “Site”), your submission is subject to the terms of this Privacy Policy and you consent to such terms.

LCG uses IP Addresses and Cookies in limited ways, as follows:

IP Addresses: An IP address is literally your computer’s address and is a unique identifier, allowing online information to be sent to the right place. We use IP addresses to better understand the customer database. We use your IP address to help diagnose problems with our server and to administer the Site. Your IP address is also used to gather broad demographic information such as geographic distribution of our members. We do not intentionally link your IP address to your personally identifiable information.

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Use of Information

When personal information is collected, we will inform you at the point of collection the purpose for the collection. LCG will not transfer your personal information to third parties without your consent, except under the limited conditions described under the section entitled “Information Sharing and Disclosure” below.

Our users are given the opportunity to “opt-out” of having their information used for purposes directly related to our Site. Users who no longer wish to receive our newsletter and promotional communications may opt-out of receiving these communications by clicking on the opt-out link included in each email. The opt-out link will immediately remove the subscriber from all future mailings. We assume you have given us your consent to collect and use your information in accordance with this Privacy Policy unless you take affirmative action to indicate that you do not consent, for instance by clicking or checking the appropriate option.

LCG uses personal information for several to fulfill your requests for certain services, to keep you up to date on the latest announcements or other information we think you would like to hear about either from us, and to better understand your needs and provide you with better services.

Information Sharing and Disclosure

We do not transfer or share your information except as provided below:

Security

LCG and its companies are committed to protecting your personal information and do so with certain physical and technological procedures. However, we cannot ensure the security of the information as you transmit it to us, and so we urge you to take every precaution to protect your personal data when you are on the Internet. This includes using a secure browser where applicable.

Notification of Changes

If we decide to change our privacy policy, we will post those changes to this privacy statement, the homepage of our website, and other places we deem appropriate so our users are always aware of what information we collect, how we use it, and under what circumstances, if any, we disclose it. We will use information in accordance with the privacy policy under which the information was collected. If, however, we are going to use users’ personally identifiable information in a manner different from that stated at the time of collection we will notify users via email. Users will have a choice as to whether or not we use their information in this different manner. If you have opted out of all communication with the Site, you will not be contacted, nor will their personal information be used in this new manner. In addition, if we make any material changes in our privacy practices that do not affect user information already stored in our database, we will post a prominent notice on our Site notifying users of the change.

Business Transitions

If LCG goes through a business transition, such as a merger, acquisition by another company, or sale of a portion of our assets, users’ personal information will, in most instances, be part of the assets transferred. If as a result of the business transition, the users’ personally identifiable information will be used in a manner different from that stated at the time of collection they will be given choice consistent with our notification of changes section.

Contact Information

If customers have any questions or suggestions regarding our privacy policy, please contact us at: hello@langtoncherubino.com.

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These Terms of Use apply to you when you view, access or otherwise use the web site located at masterpieceyourself.com (the “Site”). The Site is owned by Langton Cherubino Group, Ltd. (“LCG”). We grant you a nonexclusive, nontransferable, limited right to access, use and display the Site and the materials provided hereon, provided that you comply fully with these Terms of Use.

1. Ownership. All materials and software published on or used on the Site are protected by protected under United States and international copyright, trademark and other intellectual property laws, and are owned or controlled by or licensed to LCG, or the party listed as the provider of the materials or software. UNAUTHORIZED COPYING, REPRODUCTION, REPUBLISHING, UPLOADING, POSTING, TRANSMITTING OR DUPLICATING OF ANY OF THE MATERIAL IS PROHIBITED. “Masterpiece Yourself” and “Langton Cherubino Group” and other related marks are service marks of LCG and are protected by law.

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